sfrevu Logo with link to Main Page  
News Items- 03/2012  Next Month / Last Month
If you wish your news item to appear in our column, send your announcement to news (at) sfrevu.com

With a few exceptions, news items and announcements will be posted if they are sent to us.
With fewer exceptions, announcements not sent to us ... don't.

Short list for Arthur C. Clarke Awards Announced. by (Arthur C. Clarke Award 27 March 2012 / ) - Greg Bear, Drew Magary, China Miéville, Jane Rogers, Charles Stross and Sheri S. Tepper are the six authors shortlisted for this year’s Arthur C. Clarke Award, the UK’s premier prize for science fiction literature.

The six shortlisted books are:

Greg Bear, Hull Zero Three (Gollancz)
Drew Magary, The End Specialist (Harper Voyager)
China Miéville, Embassytown (Macmillan)
Jane Rogers, The Testament of Jessie Lamb (Sandstone Press)
Charles Stross, Rule 34 (Orbit)
Sheri S.Tepper, The Waters Rising (Gollancz)
(Source: Arthur C. Clarke Award)

Hunger Games Sets US Box Office Record by BBC News Article (BBC.co.uk, Reuters.com 25 March 2012 / ) -

(Image: The sci-fi story is set in Panem, a country that has risen from the ruins of North America)

Action film The Hunger Games has taken $155 million (£97 million) at the US box office in its opening weekend.

It is the biggest-ever tally for a film that is not a sequel, and the third best opening of all time.

Above it come last year's Harry Potter finale, which took $169.2 million (£106.6 million) in its first weekend, and 2008's The Dark Knight, which made $158.4 million (£99.8 million).

Based on Suzanne Collins' novel, "The Hunger Games" follows a teenage girl fighting to survive a life-and-death game show.

Copyright Isn't Dead Just Because We're Not Willing To Let It Regulate Us by Cory Doctorow, guardian.co.uk (guardian.co.uk, opyrighthistory.com 25 March 2012 / ) -

Anything you've ever heard of is in copyright and requires a licence - it's inherently unjust

(Even if shower-singing started to significantly displace a revenue stream for the entertainment industry, the idea of expanding an industrial regulation into a private domain is unjust. Photograph: Gio Barto)

The first time I ever heard someone declare the death of copyright, it wasn't a dreadlocked GNU/Linux hacker or a cyberpunk in mirror shades: it was a music executive, circa 1999, responding to the launch of Napster.

I thought he was wrong then and I think he's wrong now - as is everyone else who's declared copyright to be dead.

The problem is in the name: copyright. The Statute of Anne and other early copyright rules concerned themselves with verbatim copying because copying was the only industrial activity associated with creative expression at the time. There were lots of crafts associated with culture, of course, - performing music, plays and dance, painting pictures, and so on - but these weren't industrial activities.

France Comics Artist Jean Giraud - Moebius - Dies At 73 by Charles Mohapel (BBC News.co.uk, Moebius.Fr, designboom.com, IMDB.com 10 March 2012 / ) -

(Image: Jean Giraud with one of his designs in Poitiers, 2008)

Jean Giraud, one of France's leading comics artists, has died in Paris at the age of 73 after a long illness.

He drew for more than 50 years, under various names, but was most widely known as Moebius.

He was popular in the US and Japan, working with legend Stan Lee and manga artists, as well as in his homeland.

He also worked on design concepts and storyboards for a number of top science fiction films, including Alien, TRON, The Abyss, and The Fifth Element.

Giraud trained at art school and turned to comics after working as an illustrator in the advertising and fashion industries.

His best known work in his native country was probably the Lieutenant Blueberry character but he also worked on the Silver Surfer with Stan Lee.

The Cartier Foundation for Contemporary Art staged a major Giraud retrospective in 2010.

Five Hundred New Fairytales Discovered In Germany by Victoria Sussens-Messerer, Guardian.co.uk (Guardian.co.uk, Amazon.de 07 March 2012 / ) -

(Image: Spinning a yarn … King Golden Hair, one of the newly-discovered fairytales. Illustration: Barbara Stefan)

A whole new world of magic animals, brave young princes, and evil witches has come to light with the discovery of 500 new fairytales, which were locked away in an archive in Regensburg, Germany for over 150 years. The tales are part of a collection of myths, legends, and fairytales, gathered by the local historian Franz Xaver von Schönwerth (1810–1886) in the Bavarian region of Oberpfalz at about the same time as the Grimm brothers were collecting the fairytales that have since charmed adults and children around the world.

Last year, the Oberpfalz cultural curator Erika Eichenseer published a selection of fairytales from Von Schönwerth's collection, calling the book Prinz Roßzwifl. This is local dialect for "scarab beetle". The scarab, also known as the "dung beetle", buries its most valuable possession, its eggs, in dung, which it then rolls into a ball using its back legs. Eichenseer sees this as symbolic for fairytales, which she says hold the most valuable treasure known to man: ancient knowledge and wisdom to do with human development, testing our limits and salvation.

Star Wars Visionary Ralph McQuarrie Has Passed Away Aged 82 by Brendon Connelly (Bleeding Cool.com, The Star Wars Wiki, Facebook 03 March 2012 / ) -

Some of the designs in the first three Star Wars films are honestly amazing work. The man we have to thank for this is Ralph McQuarrie, the concept artist who really set the tone for the film, much more so than any other individual. And I'm including George Lucas in that.

Sadly, Ralph McQuarrie passed away today at the age of 82.

To celebrate McQuarrie's contributions to one of the most loved film series of all time, here are some of his development illustrations for Star Wars. Look at how these images embody everything there is to love about the films… and even go beyond this. I'm not being disingenuous when I say that I love these paintings far more than the films they fuelled.

McQuarrie did much more work outside of Star Wars (explore the online gallery of Battlestar Galactica paintings for some more examples), but it was with Lucas' space saga that he made the most massive of impacts. Phenomenal, really.

Goodbye, Mr. McQuarrie, and thanks.

You can pay your respects on the Ralph McQuarrie Facebook page.

Return to Index


© 2002-SFRevu

advertising index / info
Our advertisers make Gumshoe possible, and your consideration is appreciated.

Our Other Pubs:

Do You SFRevu? Thousands of Intelligent Beings Do Every Month

Gumshoe Review - a literary investigation.

© 2002-SFRevu