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Flash Fiction Online - May 2016
Edited by Suzanne W. Vincent
Review by Sam Tomaino
Flash Fiction Online  ISBN/ITEM#: 1946-1712
Date: 30 May 2016

Links: Flash Fiction Online / How to Support / Pub Info / Table of Contents /

Flash Fiction Online for May 2016 has stories by Gary Emmette Chandler, Lynette Mejía, Evan Dicken, and Stewart C. Baker.

Flash Fiction Online is a website with very short stories, updated every month. These are reviews for the new stories in their May 2016 issue.

The first new story is "Sparrows" by Gary Emmette Chandler. -+- Jacob is at the Mexico City Olympic Stadium for his first show as a Sparrow, a group of people who use a special suit to glide through the air. It had been his brother David's troupe before he had died on a car crash. As Jacob prepares to take his place, he looks back at past times with his brother. Touching and bittersweet, a beautiful story.

The second new story is "Now Watch As Belinda Unmakes the World" by Lynette Mejía. -+- As her daughter dies, Belinda works on an embroidered picture, but not in the way you might expect. Another sad, but beautiful tale.

The third new story is "Nothing Less Rare, Less Precious" by Evan Dicken. -+- A mother with a newborn must give up something she has always had when her baby is born. But there is a corresponding gain. Beautiful.

By the time you read this, the June issue might be up, but the May Flash Fiction Online should still be available. Look for it as a back issue or read any older issue. Check them out and make a donation at website.

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