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The Dark Volume by G.W. Dahlquist
Viking Hardcover  ISBN/ITEM#: 9780670916535
Date: 01 May 2008 List Price £18.99 Amazon US / Amazon UK /

The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters was a rollicking old-style serial adventure, the début novel by American Gordon Dalhquist and released last year to great acclaim and a rumoured six figure advance. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel, with its exotic blend of steampunk and magic and its feisty characters and arcane conspiracies. The whole lamplit experience has been likened to a heady mix of Sherlock Holmes, Dickens and Rider Haggard with a little bit of Buffy and the Marquis de Sade thrown in for good measure. This is a baroque comparison, but, you know what?... it pretty much covers it.

In short, Dahlquist's highly addictive début ticked a lot of boxes and was exactly the kind of rip-roaring and escapist adventure fiction that I love. And released now in hard cover from Penguin Viking is The Dark Volume, a sequel to - actually a direct continuation of - the events that took place in The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters and it is every bit as excellent and exciting as that first book. Terrific fiction and very highly recommended.

"With old loyalties tested by new and unlikely alliances, Miss Temple, Doctor Svenson, and Cardinal Chang must call on every reserve of courage to face a new and desperate struggle – after all, the integrity of their very minds is at risk. From palace intrigue and a city in turmoil to wolf-haunted mountains, underground tunnels and a suspicious hidden factory, they must overcome war and heartache to battle old enemies and a host of new villains, all hoping to seize for themselves the power of the blue glass books. Now one glass book in particular drives them all, its deadly contents the key to controlling the secrets of the blue glass, or destroying it forever."

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