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Jumper (Single-Disc Edition) by Doug Liman (Dir)
Review by Charles Mohapel
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation DVD  ISBN/ITEM#: B00177Y9ZC
Date: 30 June 2008 List Price $29.99 Amazon US / Amazon UK / Show Official Info /

Based on Jumper, a critically acclaimed Young Adult science fiction novel written by Steven C. Gould, Jumper downplays the child abuse aspect of the book, at least beyond the verbal and emotional abuse exhibited by the father of David Rice, focusing on the teleportation storyline. In the course of the movie, we discover the secret of why David's mother abandoned her 5 year old son and husband.

In a traumatic moment David is shocked by a startling new ability that manifests itself as he is about to drown in icy water - David can teleport, known as 'jumping' in the movie. Leaving Ann Arbor, MI, the 15 year old moves to New York City and learns how to control his 'jumping' abilities. Needing money to live in the Big Apple, David scouts a bank, then 'jumps' into the bank vault after closing hours and takes relatively small amount of cash. Unfortunately for him, the weird nature of the bank robbery draws the attention of the mysterious white-haired Ronald, played with a sinister edge by Samuel L. Jackson. In the course of pursuing David over the next 8 years, Ronald pretends to be working for the NSA and CIA, until he catches up to him in David's expensive multi-level loft.

And they're off to the races…

Side A

    Commentary by Director Doug Liman, Writer/Producer Simon Kinberg, and Producer Lucas Foster: On/Off

    Jumping From Novel To Film: The Past, Present, and Future of Jumper

      Based on a trio of Young Adult novels (Jumper (1992), Reflex (2004), and Jumper: Griffin's Story (2007)) by Steven C. Gould, the first book dealt with teleportation and child abuse.

      In the course of the interview with Doug Liman, Simon Kinberg, and Lucas Foster, the viewer discovers that this trio work closely together as a group and what's more unusual in Hollywood circles, they actually consult the actors.

      Confident in the box office prospects of their film, Liman, Kinberg, and Foster scripted the story as a trilogy. Given that Reflex was a direct sequel to Jumper, and that Jumper: Griffin's Story fills in the back story of Griffin, David Rice's reluctant ally.

      According to BoxOfficeMojo.com (http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=jumper.htm ), Jumper had a production budget of $85 million and as of Jun. 25, 2008, it had grossed $221,889,289 worldwide, leading me to believe that we can expect to see the next movie within 5 years.


    Trailers
      There Is No Box - FX Channel Promo
      24 Season 7 Sneak Peek
Side B
    Commentary by Director Doug Liman, Writer/Producer Simon Kinberg, and Producer Lucas Foster: On/Off

    Making An Actor Jump

      Here you get a behind-the-scenes view at the stunts, special effects, visual effects shots that make up their movie. I'm the first to admit that I love watching special features like this, but I also admit to appreciating Director Doug Liman's attitude which gives the story priority over special effects, a refreshing attitude in my opinion. Liman basically says that special effects are there to enhance the movie and not dominate it.

    Previz: Future Concepts
      This is an interesting feature where you see the story being storyboarded using blocky looking computer animation.

    Trailers
      There Is No Box - FX Channel Promo
      24 Season 7 Sneak Peek

All in all, I would have to describe Jumper as an entertaining summer movie that you watch in the comfort of your home with a big bag of popcorn.

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