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Dragon in Chains by Daniel Fox
Review by Colleen Cahill
Del Rey Paperback  ISBN/ITEM#: 9780345503053
Date: 27 January 2009 List Price $15.00 Amazon US / Amazon UK / Show Article /

Stories of dragons seem to be relegated to young people today, with the popularity of the Eragon and other such books. But the dragon is traditionally portrayed in legends of the past as a fierce monster, one that is to be feared for its destructive power. With Dragon in Chains, by Daniel Fox, we have a return to the dragon as a powerful force, one that is no friend to mankind. In a place were an Empire is perhaps falling, a chained dragon could be another tool used for ambition.

From official release/information:

From publicity material: Set in an imaginary realm that both is and isn't feudal China, Dragon in Chains is at once period piece and fantasy novel. Fox's book fills a unique niche while at the same time presents familiar archetypes that every fan of classic fantasy can relate to--pirates, monks, and magicians, with a dragon at the center o the tale.

Deposed by a usurper, the rightful emperor--a young boy named Chien--is forced to flee to the remote island of Taishu. In the mountains of this island, a young miner finds a huge stone of jade--a magical mineral whose ingestion gifts the emperor with superhuman attributes. Meanwhile, a vicious pirate captain has slaughtered a community of monks, and his boy slave has assumed the terrible burden of keeping a great dragon imprisoned beneath the strait separating Taishu from the mainland.

(Source: Del Rey)

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