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Revise the World by Brenda W. Clough
Review by Colleen Cahill
Book View Cafe  ISBN/ITEM#: BVCBWClough1
Date: 01 April 2009

Links: Book View Cafe / Show Article /

Although time travel stories can be about someone going from present to the past (such as L. Sprague De Camp's Lest Darkness Fall) or forward to the future (as with H.G. Well's Time Machine), I really enjoy the ones where someone from the past is brought forward. Partly this is because I like history and partly because these stories often reveal the oddities of our society we barely notice. Brenda W. Clough's Revise the World, an expansion of her Nebula nominated "May Be Some Time", is one such tale. Set in the very near future of 2045, we are introduced to two worlds: that of an Edwardian gentleman and that of the next generation.

From official release/information:

From site: On March 16, 1912, British polar explorer Titus Oates commits suicide by walking out of his tent into an Antarctic blizzard, to save Robert Falcon Scott and the other members of the English exploration team. His body is never found because he was snatched away into the year 2045 by scientists experimenting with a new faster-than-light drive. Arriving in the future, Oates stubbornly sticks to his old explorer job and sets off on an intergalactic adventure that leads to both knowledge and self-knowledge. The first section of this novel appeared as a novella in Analog Science Fiction magazine (April 2001) under the title "May Be Some Time." It was a finalist for both the Nebula and the Hugo awards.

(Source: Book View Cafe)

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