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Star Trek: Motion Picture Trilogy [Blu-ray] by Nicholas Meyer (Director)
Review by Charles Mohapel
Paramount Home Entertainment Blu-ray  ISBN/ITEM#: B001TH16D8
Date: 31 May 2009 List Price $65.99 Amazon US / Amazon UK

Links: Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan / Star Trek III: The Search For Spock / Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home / Show Official Info /

When I heard from my contact at the PR agency handling Paramount Home Entertainment that Star Trek: Motion Picture Trilogy was coming out on Blu-ray and DVD, I checked the press release and saw that the three movies were Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan, Star Trek III: The Search For Spock, and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.

Star Trek: Motion Picture Trilogy [Blu-ray]
Each of the three discs begins with a trailer for the 2009 J.J.Abrams Star Trek movie and a promo for Star Trek: The Original Series, Season 1 on Blu-ray.

Disc 1:
Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan Running Time: 113 minutes
Having exiled Khan Noonien Singh to Ceti Alpha V at the conclusion of Space Seed in Season 1, James t. Kirk doesn't give him another thought. Years later Khan gets his opportunity for revenge and comes gunning for Kirk.

Extras:
Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan with Commentary by Director Nicholas Meyer
After watching the movie, I would recommend watching it a second time with Director Nicholas Meyer providing his commentary from start to finish. At the start of his discourse, he refers to himself as a storyteller and I certainly can't argue with him. When he came onto the scene, there were five separate scripts, all with flaws and strong points, and after some brainstorming, the decision was taken to use key parts of each script. I was somewhat surprised to learn that Meyer made extensive use of storyboards.

Meyer smiles as he relates the story of how William Shatner was not happy about Meyer's script, but 24 hours later the script was fixed and 12 hours after that, Shatner left a message calling Meyer a genius on his answering mission. Meyer was so pleased that he removed the tape and saved it, a wise decision for him, less so for Shatner. After that every time that Shatner complained to Meyer, he (Meyer) would play back Shatner's own words, adding "Genius!" -- you said it yourself!

Praising the professionalism of Ricardo Montalban, Meyer relates how Montalban's first scene was completely shot in one take, a far from common occurrence.

Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan with Commentary by Director Nicholas Meyer and Manny Coto
Another option is to watch the film again, this time with Nicholas Meyer and Manny Coto providing the commentary. Coto's connection with Star Trek is that he served as Co-Executive Producer, then as Executive Producer for Enterprise / Star Trek: Enterprise. He gushed over Nicholas Meyer to a point where I suspect Meyer became embarrassed by all the praise. Personally I prefer Meyer providing his commentary solo.

Library Computer
This features Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan with Commentary by Director Nicholas Meyer and Manny Coto, but with the significant addition of a virtual ship's library computer. If you see something that interests you as the film plays, click on one of the icons and additional information pops up on the screen in Real Time. (Blu-ray Exclusive)

Production

  • Captain's Log
    Not only did we see William Shatner delivering a stream of humorous comments with a fairly convincing deadpan, we were also treated to Leonard Nimoy, Nicholas Meyer, Writer Harve Bennett, and Ricardo Montalban reminiscing for the camera. You can see the genuine respect and friendship between Meyer and Bennett as they praise each other's work. This was a very enjoyable feature and one that I wish had been longer. (27:00)

  • Designing Khan
    I've always had a great interest in what happens behind the scenes on every film and TV show I've ever enjoyed. Production Designer Joe Jennings, Costume Designer Robert Fletcher, and Art Director Lee Cole share a few goodies with the viewers. While Nicholas Meyer admits to not being a science fiction fan, he was able to visualize Captain Kirk as Horatio Hornblower, a mental process that allowed him to elicit the best from Shatner.

    Until I watched this feature I had not been aware of how great a divide there used to be between making a movie and making a TV show. Where filmmakers throw away sets and props once a production is over, TV shows made a concerted effort to reuse and recycle props and sets when recycling was not the worldwide priority it is now. With smaller budgets, TV shows had to be more creative in getting the most use from their resources. This even included the paper mache used to separate fluorescent light tubes which ended up being used as parts of sets. (23:50)

  • Original Interviews
    These are the interviews conducted during the filming of Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan and feature William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, and Ricardo Montalban. It was a real treat watching the interviews and the wonderful photos that followed, but I would have been happier if this featurette had run another 10 or 20 minutes. (10:56)

  • Where No Man Has Gone Before: The Visual Effects of Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan
    Special Effects Supervisor Ken Ralston of ILM, Ed Catmul (Computer Graphics), Modelmaker William George, Supervising Modelmaker Steve Gawley, and Director Nicholas Meyer share their thoughts on how the visual and special effects used in the making of Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan built upon previous work and pushed the envelope to the point where they were breaking new ground.

    Prior to watching the featurette I had seen the Vistavision name in the end credits of many a movie, but when I saw it on the screen for the first time, I saw just how massive this camera is.

    Probably the coolest segment was how they laboriously created the Mutara Nebula in a cloud tank.

    Whether you're a budding filmmaker or videographer, or just someone interested in a peek behind the curtains, this is a must watch segment. (18:14)

  • James Horner: Composing Genesis (HD)
    Credited in the IMDB.com website as having been the composer for more than 130 films and TV shows. Winner of 2 Oscars and 32 other awards, his career was in its early years when he was chosen to compose the original music for Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan. Listening to him talk about his work on the film was interesting. (9:33)

The Star Trek Universe

  • Collecting Star Trek's Movie Relics (HD)
    Alec Peters, CEO of Propworx talks about how after 10 movies and 28 seasons spanning all five TV series, the collection of props, artifacts, and relics had grown so large that they filled six warehouses. The 2006 auction held by Christie's helped reduce the size of this collection to somewhat more manageable levels. (11:05)

  • A Novel Approach
    While I have no doubt that Greg Cox and Julia Ecklar are nice people, I've attended far more interesting author readings, kaffeklatsches, and talks than this featurette. (28:55)

  • Starfleet Academy Scisec Brief 002: Mystery Behind Ceti Alpha VI (HD)
    This pseudo-scientific briefing seemed to have have created as filler, but in my opinion they should have either done more with it or not bothered at all. (3:08)

Storyboards

  • Main Title Concept
  • Kobayashi Maru
  • Ceti Alpha V
  • Regula I
  • Chekov and Terrell Find Khan
  • Admiral's Inspection
  • Khan's Revenge
  • Kirk Strikes Back
  • Finding the Genesis Cave
  • The Mutara Nebula
  • Sneak Attack
  • Genesis
  • Honored Dead

These hand drawn storyboards look very much like the panels of a comic book and would make an excellent teaching tool for budding filmmakers and videographers.

Farewell - A Tribute To Ricardo Montalban (HD)
An excellent featurette, this is a moving and understated tribute by Nicholas Meyer as he speaks of Ricardo Montalban, actor and man. (4:44)

Theatrical Trailer for Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan
Even though I've watched the film many times, watching the trailer made me want to see it again.

Star Trek I.Q. (BD-Live)
Since my Blu-ray is an older model, it does not support BD-Live, not even after the most recent firmware update. (Blu-ray Exclusive)

Disc 2:
Star Trek III: The Search For Spock Running Time: 105 minutes
Although Spock's body has died, his Katra is being carried around by a quasi-schizoid Dr. McCoy and upon discovering that Spock has been "reborn" on the Genesis Planet. By now the Klingon Empire has learned of the Genesis Device and sent a Bird of Prey commanded by Commander Kruge. In his obsessive desire to capture it, Kruge kills the son that Kirk never knew he had until the previous movie.

Extras:
Star Trek III: The Search For Spock with Commentary by Director Leonard Nimoy, Writer/Producer Harve Bennett, Director of Photographer Charles Correll, and Actress Robin Curtis
I always enjoyed watching Star Trek III: The Search For Spock, but watching it with the commentary of these principals was a special treat. Nimoy talks of auditioning Christopher Lloyd and how the two of them clicked right from the start, to the point where Nimoy strongly recommended hiring him on the spot. I was amused to find that the janitor watching the "stolen" Enterprise leaving Spacedock was none other than Director of Photographer Charles Correll.

One cool fact was that Stage 15, the one used for the Genesis Planet had previously been used by Cecil B. DeMille to film the parting of the Red Sea in The Ten Commandments. Subsequently it had almost burned down during a major fire on the Paramount back lot, but was saved from damage beyond a few holes in the back wall by the swift reactions of the cast and crew of Star Trek III: The Search For Spock, and other Paramount employees who labored heroically until the fire department arrived.

For the scene where Spock's Katra is to be transferred back to him, circumstances dictated that they order a very specialized and powerful light from England.

Star Trek III: The Search For Spock with Commentary by Ronald B. Moore and Michael Taylor
Ronald B. Moore had served as Visual Effects Supervisor/Coordinator on Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Generations, Star Trek: Voyager, and Enterprise / Star Trek: Enterprise. Michael Taylor had been a writer for Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, as well as a writer and Story Editor / Executive Story Editor for Star Trek: Voyager. As interesting as their perspective on Star Trek III: The Search For Spock was, it pales in comparison to the commentary by the people who actually worked on it.

Library Computer
This features Star Trek III: The Search For Spock with Commentary by Ronald B. Moore and Michael Taylor, but with the addition of a virtual ship's library computer. If you see something that interests you as the film plays, click on one of the icons and additional information pops up on the screen in Real Time. (Blu-ray Exclusive)

Production

  • Captain's Log
    William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, Writer/Producer Harve Bennett, Associate Producer Ralph Winter, Director of Photographer Charles Correll, Actor Christopher Lloyd, and Actress Robin Curtis share their thoughts and memories with us. Again Shatner gives a deadpan delivery of the story of how Nimoy became the director of Star Trek III: The Search For Spock. Nimoy talks of the difficulties he had to overcome to become the director. At that time Michael Eisner was President and CEO at Paramount and like many people he believed the untrue story that Nimoy had had a clause in his contract for Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan that Spock would die and that he was finished playing the character forever. When Nimoy was finally able to speak to Eisner, Eisner told him about the story, at which point Nimoy pointed out that this contract was located in the same building as Eisner's office and if Eisner would send one of his people to the room where the contracts were stored, said document would disprove the story once and for all. And that was the end of the problem.

    Equally hilarious is Shatner's deadpan story of how Nimoy became his acolyte.

    Charles Correll speaks of how he wanted to photograph the Genesis Planet on the Hawaiian island of Kaua'i, but he was overruled. His hopes rose when Stage 15 was damaged in the big fire, but once again his hopes were dashed. (26:13)

  • Terraforming and the Prime Directive
    Author David Brin, Chris McKay (Research Scientist, NASA Ames Research Center), and Dr. Louis Friedman (Executive Director, The Planetary Society) provide a fascinating science discussion. (25:53)

  • Industrial Light & Magic: The Visual Effects of Star Trek (HD)
    Visual Effects Supervisor Scott Farrar, Visual Effects Supervisor Bill George, Visual Effects Director of Photographer Pat Sweeney, and Digital Model Artist John Goodson share their thoughts with us. Farrar talks about the Enterprise had been given a fancy paint job for Star Trek: The Motion Picture, but when it arrived at ILM, it received a new matte paint job so that it wouldn't reflect the bluescreen. This was one very cool feature. (13:50)

  • Spock: The Early Years (HD)
    Stephen Manley who played Spock at Age 17 in the film talks about the casting and his work on the film. (6:22)

The Star Trek Universe

  • Space Docks and Birds of Prey
    Associate Producer Ralph Winter, Additional Spacecraft Designer Bill George of ILM, Supervising Modelmaker Steve Gawley, and Visual Effects Cameraman Scott Farrar (significantly younger here) talk about working on the film.

    Bill George designed the Excelsior and speaks of how he was really into Japanese art and Industrial Design - his inspiration was the thought "What if the Japanese had designed the Enterprise?". Like many people I find the Industrial Design school of the 1980s to be a subjective thing and a matter of taste.

    On the other hand the Klingon Bird of Prey is much cooler and the prototype was made with moving wings.

    One of my favorite parts was listening to Scott Farrar talking about the technique of bluescreen and optically composited shots.

  • Speaking Klingon
    Marc Okrand, creator of the Klingon language as we know, talks of how he came onboard for Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan. I was surprised to hear that Jimmy Doohan had created the small amount of Klingon used in Star Trek: The Motion Picture and it was spoken by Mark Lenard who played the Klingon captain. Okrand speaks of how he would get together with the actors playing Klingons on most days, but that Chris Lloyd was very enthusiastic about practicing with him. (21:04)

  • Klingon and Vulcan Costumes
    Maggie Schpak talks of how she and her partner have made lots of jewelery and insignia for the Star Trek films going all the way back to Star Trek: The Motion Picture. Costume Designer Robert Fletcher happily recounts of how he designed the Klingon foreheads. (12:16)

  • Star Trek and the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame (HD)
    Filmed in Seattle with Mark Rahner, the Pop Culture Writer for the Seattle Times and Harve Bennett, we get a tour of the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame escorted by Jacob McMurray and James Brooks Peck. Bennett relates how Bill Shatner could not perform the Vulcan salute and how they had to use fishwire for Star Trek III: The Search For Spock.

    My favorite part of this featurette was when Bennett related how they added Cyrillic titles to Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home and screened for a World Wildlife Federation event held at the Moscow Motion Picture Academy. Right at the end of the film, Bones is saying that they will probably get a freighter since the bureaucratic mentality is the only constant in the universe. The Moscow audience reacted by bursting into a hearth five minute laugh at this caustic observation. (16:52)

  • Starfleet Academy Scisec Brief 003: The Mystery Behind the Vulcan Katra Transfer (HD)
    Like its twin on Disc 1 this pseudo-scientific briefing seemed to have have created as filler, but in my opinion they should have either done more with it or not bothered at all. (2:42)

Photo Gallery

  • Production
    Another very cool feature where I felt like I was on the set during filming.

  • The Movie
    Speaking as a photographer I have a good idea of how difficult it is to get shots and still be unobtrusive at times, so this section is quite impressive.

Storyboards

  • Main Titles
  • The Klingons Attack
  • Entering Spacedock
  • Search For Life
  • Finding Spock
  • Destruction of the Grissom
  • Stealing the Enterprise
  • Self Destruct
  • Kirk Fights Kruge
  • Katra Ritual

Theatrical Trailer for Star Trek III: The Search For Spock
Even though I've watched this film many times too, watching the trailer made me want to see it again.

Star Trek I.Q. (BD-Live)
Since my Blu-ray is an older model, it does not support BD-Live, not even after the most recent firmware update. (Blu-ray Exclusive)

Disc 3:
Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Running Time: 119 minutes
Having "reunited" Spock's Katra with his body, the crew of the destroyed Enterprise have to return home in the captured Klingon Bird of Prey to face court martial for the theft of the Enterprise, its destruction, and a host of other lesser charges. Nearing Earth, they discover that Earth is being threatened by an immense alien probe and only they can save the day - maybe.

At the very beginning of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, the following appears onscreen:
The cast and crew of Star Trek wish to dedicate this film to the men and women of the spaceship Challenger whose courageous spirit shall live to the 23rd century and beyond....

Extras:
Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home with Commentary by William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy
Shatner begins by saying that he doesn't like Time Travel stories since they're too easy, referring to them as "Deus ex machina".

I really enjoyed the easy banter between Shatner and Nimoy, particularly the fond reminisces of the late DeForrest Kelley.

Nimoy talks of how Jane Wyatt who played Spock's mother had appeared in Lost Horizon, the 1937 film directed by Frank Capra, but on Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, his grandson Frank Capra III was the 2nd assistant director.

Will Rogers Park in West LA ended up being used as a substitute for a rain-soaked Golden Gate Park.

Kirk Thatcher who played the spiky-haired punk rocker put to sleep using a Vulcan nerve pinch on the San Francisco city bus was actually Nimoy's liaison to ILM.

I wonder how many people outside the production are aware that Harve Bennett wrote Acts 1 and 4, while Nicholas Meyer wrote Acts 2 and 3.

The chase scene where Chekov escapes from the authorities and leads them on a merry chase across the nuclear-powered Enterprise anchored off Alameda was actually filmed on board the non nuclear-powered USS Ranger (CV-61), docked in San Diego.

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home with Commentary by Robert Orci and Alex Kurtzman, co-writers of the 2009 Star Trek directed by J.J. Abrams are fans of the series who grew up and became writers for the franchise. Being from a different generation than Shatner and Nimoy, their perspective differs. Like most Star Trek fans, they feel that Star Trek: The Motion Picture almost killed the franchise, Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan revived it, and Star Trek III: The Search For Spock and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home turned into a trilogy.

Library Computer
This features Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home with Commentary by Robert Orci and Alex Kurtzman, but with the addition of a virtual ship's library computer. If you see something that interests you as the film plays, click on one of the icons and additional information pops up on the screen in Real Time. (Blu-ray Exclusive)

Production

  • Futures Past: A Look Back
    An excellent featurette with Leonard Nimoy, William Shatner, Harve Bennett, Executive Producer Ralph Winter, Writer Nicholas Meyer, Actress Catherine Hicks, and Associate Producer Kirk Thatcher who also appeared as the punk rocker on the San Francisco bus. Watching that scene without any music was hilarious since you got to hear the cast talking after the official take was over, but the camera was still rolling.

    Unlike Bill Shatner, Leonard Nimoy likes Time Travel stories, saying that they open up opportunities.

    When the production discovered that a 20 foot by 48 foot pool formerly existed on the Paramount back lot, but sometime in the past it had been filled with sand, paved over with asphalt, and used as a parking lot, they cleared it out for use. Not surprisingly they were not the most popular people at Paramount among those who had lost their parking spaces. (27:32)

  • On Location
    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home was filmed for 10 days in the most recognizable locations in San Francisco, as well as at the Monterey Aquarium, San Diego, West Los Angeles, and El Segundo. My favorite segment was about the two days of shooting in San Diego and how they had to race to beat the real Marines to the chow line - if they lost the race to the big eaters, they were out of luck. (7:26)

  • Dailies Deconstruction
    I don't know about you but until I watched this featurette, I had never viewed movie dailies directly, only on the screen in other featurettes and TV shows. I also do not remember them being footage shot simultaneously of the same scene by two separate cameras. (4:06)

  • Below The Lines: Sound Design
    Here Sound Effects Editor Mark Mangini talks about working on the audio part of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. (11:45)

  • Pavel Chekov's Screen Moments (HD)
    Walter Koenig smiles as he relates how the producers used Russian music during the scene where the (real) Marines chase him across the carrier. Having seen just how gung ho these Marine guards were in Real Life, he ran as fast as he could for real. In Real Life, when the Marine guards are pursuing a suspect on board a ship, regulations dictate that everybody else, regardless of rank, drops to the deck. If someone is too slow to drop or gets stepped on accidentally, well, that's just too bad for them. Obviously Mama Koenig didn't raise a dummy.(6:09)

Star Trek Universe

  • Time Travel: The Art Of The Possible
    What do Nick Herbert, Fred Alan Wolfe, and Jack Sarfatti have in common? They're all Ph.D Quantum Physicists who in 2002 were asked the question "Is Time Travel possible?". They came up with some interesting replies. (11:15)

  • Language of Whales
    Interesting, especially if you support Greenpeace. (5:47)

  • A Vulcan Primer
    Author Margaret Wander Bonanno fills us in on Vulcan society, an interesting little feature. (7:49)

  • Kirk's Women
    Altogether too short for my tastes, this features Catherine (Dr. Gillian Taylor) Hicks, Katherine (Deela) Browne, Louise (Rayna) Sorel, and Celeste (Yeoman Martha Landon) Yarnell. Sorel talks about having known Shatner from before her guest starring in the Season 3 episode "Requiem for Methuselah" and Yarnell talks about how sexy Kirk/Shatner is. And she isn't the only woman to feel that Kirk and Shatner are so intertwined together, mischievous, and interested in what a woman is saying. (8:20)

  • Star Trek: The Three-Picture Saga (HD)
    An interesting interlude with Writer/Producer Harve Bennett, Executive Producer Ralph Winter, Author Garfield Reeve-Stevens, Author Judith Reeve-Stevens, Writer/Director Nicholas Meyer, and Walter Koenig, plus Steve Meerson and Peter Krikes who co-wrote the screenplay with Bennett and Meyer. For me the most memorable part was where Ralph Winter talks about developing the script for ST III as they were making ST II and developing the script for ST IV as they were making ST III. (10:12)

  • Star Trek For A Cause (HD)
    Representing Greenpeace, Karen Sack and John Frizzell talk about how Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home and the attendant publicity helped reduce commercial whaling. Both Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner are longtime Greenpeace supporters and in the video they say that if you join Greenpeace, Shatner will actually phone you. (5:40)

  • Starfleet Academy Scisec Brief 004: The Whale Probe (HD)
    This pseudo-scientific briefing seemed to have have created as filler, but in this case it was actually more interesting than the same features on Discs 1 and 2. (3:42)

Visual Effects

  • From Outer Space To The Ocean
    A very interesting segment featuring Leonard Nimoy, Robotics Engineer Walt Conti (whale creator at ILM), Visual Effects Cameraman Selwyn Eddy, Sean Casey (Whale Mold Supervisor), Computer Graphic Supervisor Douglas Key, Modelshop Supervisor Jeff Mann, and Effects Cameraman Pat Sweeney. Walt Conti smiles as he recounts how on the Monday following the release of the film, the studio received irate phone calls from several animals rights groups, and how they were shocked when they were informed that what they thought were real whales were actually sophisticated replicas.

    Douglas Key talks about the work performed by legendary concept illustrator Ralph McQuarrie who served as a visual consultant on Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, who worked on the Time Travel sequence. Jeff Mann speaks of how the alien probe was very problematical for bluespill problems. Pat Sweeney talks about how their scale model Bird of Prey just didn't work properly when they tried flying it under the scale model of the Golden Gate Bridge (we see some footage that proves just how poorly it performed), and how they solved the problem by compositing the shot using a motion control rig. (14:43)

  • Bird of Prey
    Here Leonard Nimoy talks about his vision of how the Bird of Prey should be used. (2:49)

Original Interviews
I believe that the same person conducted all three interviews during the filming of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home and frankly, I've seen 5-year-old children who were more impressive interviewers.

  • William Shatner
    Interviewed on set in front of the Bird of Prey, Shatner was very polite but came across like a cat toying with a feeble-minded mouse. (14:32)

  • Leonard Nimoy
    Interviewed in an office Nimoy is also very polite as he divulges as much of the plot as he feels is prudent. (15:35)

  • DeForest Kelley
    Interviewed on board the Bird of Prey, Kelley comes across as the charming Southern gentleman he was, gracious to a fault, even to an incompetent interviewer. Listening to the interview I really wish I could have met him. (13:02)

Tributes

  • Roddenberry Scrapbook
    Eugene W. Roddenberry Jr., aka Rod Roddenberry, was Gene Roddenberry's son by Majel Barrett and only 17 years old at the time of his father's death. In this pleasantly low key interview, Rod speak of Gene, not as "the Great Bird of the Galaxy", but simply as Dad. (8:17)

  • Mark Lenard
    Here we listen to his wife Ann and daughters Roberta and Catherine talking about their late husband/father in a wonderful segment. Majel Barrett once describer Mark as a "Gentleman's Gentleman". (12:45)

Production Gallery
A very cool slideshow of still photos taken during filming and set to appropriate music. (3:55)

Storyboards

  • Encounter with the Saratoga
  • The Probe Approaches Earth
  • Time Warp
  • Mind Meld
  • The Whaling Ship
  • Return to the 23rd Century
  • Communication
  • NCC-1701-A

Theatrical Trailer for Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
Even though I've watched this film many times too, watching the trailer made me want to see it again.

Star Trek I.Q. (BD-Live)
Since my Blu-ray is an older model, it does not support BD-Live, not even after the most recent firmware update. (Blu-ray Exclusive)

There are so many great bonus features on the 3 Blu-ray disc set of the Star Trek: Motion Picture Trilogy that it makes a fantastic gift for Father's Day, graduation, or the Trekker in your family

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